Dr. Visit…

Ugh. I’ve not been looking forward to this.

Last week I went for my blood work so my doctor would have it prior to my visit. Friday was my appointment.

She was thrilled. My blood work was great. A1C = 6.6. She was happy, I was disappointed, actually, amazed!  “If you saw what I’ve been eating, you’d never believe that’s accurate.” Dr. G responded, “It will catch up to you, you know that.”  Yeah, yeah. I didn’t respond — she’s ALWAYS right.

For awhile now, I’ve been taking two Metformin instead of three. My goal is to get off them completely. The ONLY way to do that is to stay on track — no diversions. Lately, I’ve been the Queen of Diversions! 

A little over a week ago denial crept in (with a vengeance). I actually ate potato chips and onion dip. 😦  It didn’t kill me, but what a stupid decision. And then there was the pie…cookies… Yes, I didn’t fall off the “wagon” I took a deep-dive plunge. Ugh.

The good news is, I’m back to healthy choices. If I have to have desserts, I’ll be heading to my sugar free Jello or small portions of fresh fruit.

Just remember there is such a thing as TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING (fruit can fall right into that category!)

IMG_3486
Monitor glucose regularly

Obviously, I didn’t do too much damage, or 6.6 would have been WAY higher. I absolutely do NOT want to go back to 3 Metformin/day, so I’m re-committing myself again to staying on track — DAMN IT! It’s all about accountability, as always. There’s no hiding those numbers and not taking my blood sugar, is just plain irresponsible. I’m determined.

I know that when I’m dedicated and determined, I get involved in a project using my hands. I know when I do the artsy/craftsy thing, I won’t snack/eat the wrong foods.

I know that when I sit and watch TV, I’m putting myself at risk. Gigunda risk!!! I become bored and troll the cabinets for something “bad.” Rarely do I find anything, because I don’t buy the foods/snacks that I know I shouldn’t be eating. I wish I could tell you that I give up and go back to watching the tube. That would not be true. There are times when I cave. I’ve walked and driven to the corner store or the gas station for a candy bar to “tide me over.”  (I sound like a drug addict. Well, sugar IS a drug!) .

Diabetes sucks. Yes, it does. BUT, there are worse diseases, that’s for sure! So, I’ll be grateful and get back on the bike and do the right thing — one day at a time.

IMG_3344

This disease is one heck of a roller-coaster, that’s for sure. Better days ahead.

Back to DAY #1!

 

Advertisements

BELATED HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Happy that 2016 has arrived?  I sure am.

My last post was December 4th.  I’ve been slightly distracted — a brief hospital stay (thanks to my wacko heart), and side effects of a new medication, kept me from posting.  BUT, I’m back in action and really happy and grateful to be writing again!   IMG_3344

So, dare I bring up Resolutions for the New Year?  If you made any, have you kept them?

Many moons ago I stopped making resolutions.  Why, you ask?  Simple. I rarely kept them and then suffered remorse, which resulted in doing MORE of what I had resolved to do LESS. 🙂   I decided that a more positive path would put more balance into my life. Focusing on BALANCE — that’s the answer!  Every area of our lives, food, exercise, family, work, all require balance.

The question is, How do we manage this juggling act, we call life?  I have some ideas on this topic. I’ve tried many methods to get this miss-mosh of a life in order. Some have been somewhat successful, others might be referred to as a dismal failure. What’s imperative is that we KEEP ON TRYING!  Here’s a suggestion, based on something that I always need to do:  MAKE A LIST…

There’s no way to have balance in our life, if we don’t know what it is that we value. So…

1.  MAKE A LIST— not in any specific order.  Do you value Work, Fun (recreation), Health, Friends, Spirituality, Family?  Any others?  Write them down.

2.   O.K., now take another sheet of paper and place it next to the list you’ve just completed.  Write PRIORITIES, at the top of this page.  Don’t rush.  Think carefully.

3.  Now, take your first list and write those things that you value, on your PRIORITIES LISTin order, of course, of priority! How important is each one to you, and where should it fit in on the list?  Don’t worry, you can’t make a mistake — this is YOUR list.  [Actually, I found this the most difficult part — What?  You don’t want FUN to be your #1 priority???]   🙂

4.   Next, take your list of priorities, and and create a chart that will allow you to manage your time in relation to your priorities.  Write the amount of TIME (hours, minutes) that you are willing and able to devote to each. Hmmm, is this exercise starting to make you feel uncomfortable?  Don’t panic, you’ll figure it out, and nothing is written in stone. Time is fluid, and sometimes we’re forced to make adjustments.

At this point, you’ve carefully examined your list of priorities — you’ve committed, in writing, those things, tasks, and people that you value the most AND, you’ve established the amount of time that you’re able to devote to each.  GOOD FOR YOU!        

IMG_3342
I CAN DO IT!

For ME managing my diabetes HAS to come FIRST on my list, and I imagine on yours, as well.  Most of us Type 2 diabetics have learned that, if we don’t put management of our diabetes first, nothing else falls into place.

Reflecting at the end of the day (I journal) has helped me to see what area(s) need to be improved.

IMG_3501
My journal helps to keep me on track!

Making time to do those things that make us happy, bring enjoyment to our life, is IMPERATIVE.

We only go this way once, folks!  At least, I think so…

HAPPY NEW YEAR, dear readers, and may 2016 bring laughter, love, and good health into each of your lives — Oh, and BALANCE too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Doctor and Me — A Partnership

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Feeling so much better. Got an appointment with my own doctor Thursday evening. By then, I was on the upswing but still not my usually fun-filled self.

“I need a cure,” I told her. She rolled her eyes, we have this “dance.” She did a chest x-ray and blood work, told me (what I already knew) that the Tamiflu wasn’t doing anything. I stopped it. Likely, my dilemma was probably an evil virus. She gave me a prescription for nasal spray that was miraculous — I can actually breathe. I kept taking the Tylenol, and within two more days, fever gone and, I was back in action. I realize that within a couple of days, it may have left me anyway, but her help certainly alleviated my symptoms.

EVERYONE deserves a good doctor. My mother was a nurse and she used to tell us to remember that, “they’re only human.” Over the years, I’ve learned that these words are true. Nobody’s perfect. I know that. But, I’ve become a “Doctor Snob.” By that I mean, I have insurance, and I know how to do research. I use the Internet to check out a doctors’ credentials. If I think he/she is the person for me, I try them. If I’m not comfortable, I’m out of there, and the search continues. I consider word of mouth recommendations, knowing that we’re all different. This method has served me well in way too many instances.

“Dr. G.” hates that I think she’s a magician. But, she has been exactly that for me. She is an incredible diagnostician and has never steered me wrong. She’s held my hand through a lot of “thrilling” experiences. Neurosurgery — if it wasn’t for her “investigative skills,” I don’t know where I’d be! She was persistent, relentless, and incredibly caring. Just knowing that she was there for me, was a huge support.

She diagnosed my A-fib and referred me to a wonderful cardiologist who texted her to let her know how I was, after he did my ablation. That’s how much she cares.

She found the diabetes. Of course, I argued that it was ridiculous and impossible for ME to be diabetic. She was patient and walked me through the process, and here I am still learning, fighting the fight, and dedicated to being healthy — even with diabetes. “Dr. G” has been my support. She’s relentless, monitoring me at every turn. Months back I was having a terrible time — out of control. I knew I needed more accountability. Dr. G. told me to journal my blood sugar every day, taking it before and after breakfast, lunch and dinner. (Later, we changed it to just breakfast and dinner.) I kept a chart and faxed it to her at the end of each week. It was great. I felt supported. Just charting it helped me to eat better! That extra form of accountability was really helpful. Then, during appointments, we discussed my numbers and figured out any areas of concern, regarding my eating. She cares, and we work together to keep me healthy. I’ll never leave her.

If you don’t have a doctor like that, keep looking. You deserve it! We all do.

“Acceptance”

Monday, September 22, 2014

Once I accepted that I actually had diabetes, I set out to become the poster-person for what I termed, “this miserable disease.”

Not happily, I went on medication. “Not for long,” I told my doctor. Believing that I could do this with diet and exercise, I set about on my journey to lower my blood sugar. Come hell or high water!

No more cakes, cookies, candy, OH, MY! This wasn’t going to be easy, but I was determined. Apples became my salvation — sliced VERY thin (kind of like potato chips, but not). I brought them to work, and devoured them at home. No, it wasn’t the same, but my blood sugar was coming down.

Next on my agenda was exercise. HAHAHAHA! No, really. That’s what they told me to do. This girl was not about to darken the doorway of any self-respecting gym; it just wasn’t going to happen.

I was told that walking, plain old walking, would bring down my blood sugar. I can walk. And walk I did! Evidently, this basic form of exercise has a great effect on belly-fat. Seriously, it was falling off me — probably left in the street somewhere 🙂
You might not have said I was Overweight, but I did need to lose some pounds, and walking did it.

Started WALKING!
Started WALKING!

It wasn’t long before I could see the results. I did notice something else though, my blood sugar was going down and so was I. I began to feel light-headed and sometimes actually passing out. After conferring with my doctor, we decided that I would stop the medication. I did it! I succeeded in lowering my blood sugar through diet and exercise. I thought I was “cured!” Maybe not…