DIABETES — I laugh in your face…

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Who knew?  Not me!  Evidently Tom Hanks was diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes and announced it on the David Letterman Show in 2013.  Guess I missed that episode.

As you know, I believe in using humor to help me through my day with diabetes. However, when watching the link (see below) about his diagnosis, I wanted to say, “Be careful, Mr. Hanks, guess who might just have the last laugh?”  

Tom Hanks is an actor whom I admire and was hoping that he was taking his diagnosis seriously, when I came upon an article in a magazine known as Diabetes Focus.

img_5846

The article mentioned his announcement on the Letterman Show,  but it also went on to explain the steps he and his wife (Rita Wilson) were taking to manage his T2D and improving their lifestyle as a whole. Those steps included limiting sugar and exercising on a daily basis. He took it seriously.

Hanks pointed out that genetics plays an important role and that he was “genetically inclined” to get the disease.  I wish I’d understood that, those many years ago when I was diagnosed.  I’d had two babies that weighed in at 9.3 lbs. and 9 pounds even, and I was informed that gestational diabetes simply meant that I “might get diabetes later in life.” It was treated as “nothing to worry about.”  Believe me, that “later in life” showed up much sooner than I’d anticipated!

The GOOD NEWS in this is that, SO much more is known about diabetes today and, it’s no longer treated as “nothing to worry about.” It’s an epidemic, and I’m hoping that parents world wide are paying attention to their medical history, the food that they and their children are eating and the exercise that takes place with their family members each day.

Should we LAUGH IN THE FACE OF DIABETES?  Hell yeah! BUT, only with the knowledge that we are controlling it with diet, exercise, and medication (if needed). It’s a serious matter, that can be dealt with a dose of humor — to get through the day.  🙂

Sometimes, Laughter is the Best Medicine!    🙂

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Taking the “Leap”

Monday, February 29, 2016

Happy Birthday to those of you who were born during a leap year!  (Click on that link to check out the history.) Celebrating one’s birthday every four years seems strange to me. I guess I can’t imagine doing that. How must you feel on March 1st when February 28th was the day before, and there was no recognition of your entry to this planet?  Sad? Abandoned? Invisible? I don’t get it.

I have a friend who celebrated her birthday yesterday. She told me that she ALWAYS wished she had been born on the 29th — “A Leap Year birthday is awesome,” she exclaimed! She felt cheated, because the year she was brought into this world was, in fact, a leap year. “One more day! Just one more, and I could feel unique.”

“You’re unique, trust me,” I responded. Still unsure of  her logic, I asked, “Why? I don’t understand — you get ripped off with every passing year; no cake, no presents. How can this be a good thing?”

Laughing, she responded, “It’s simple. I’d feel SPECIAL!” she insisted. “Not abandoned or invisible. And by the way,” she smiled, “I know I’d feel younger. Think about it, with each birthday celebration, I could subtract 3 years!”

Not sure her math was accurate, I went with her theory. “I guess LEAPING from one birthday to the next (four years later) has some advantages.” So, to those of you who have that SPECIAL Leap Year Birthday, I hope you had a wonderful time celebrating today! And just think, four years from now you can do it again.   🙂

I digress — moving on to DIABETES!  The “LEAP” to which I’m referring, is a bold jump,  into making even better choices and a healthier lifestyle.  Are you thinking, “Weren’t we working on that already?”

“Yes, we have been, but I’m suggesting that we take a giant LEAP forward in the management of our diabetes.  MY LEAP will include:  testing more for the next two weeks, watching my patterns more closely, monitoring what goes into my mouth more carefully, paying strict attention to exercising (in my case, walking my butt off). LOGGING ALL OF IT.  What a pain in the …  Maybe, but this T2D can do it for the next two weeks.  I can do that. TWO WEEKS — one day at a time!  C’mon…

At the end of my two week marathon of healthier living, I’ll review what I’ve done. If my numbers are better, and I feel more energetic, my plan is to keep going for the rest of the month. When March comes to an end, I’ll determine if I’m committed enough, dedicated enough, to take the LEAP into April with the same regime. I’m counting on ME.

Let’s face it, what’s more important than a healthy lifestyle?

Want to join me?  TAKE THE “LEAP.”

Blood Sugar = 109      Weight: 150.9   WHAT????

 

 

“Acceptance”

Monday, September 22, 2014

Once I accepted that I actually had diabetes, I set out to become the poster-person for what I termed, “this miserable disease.”

Not happily, I went on medication. “Not for long,” I told my doctor. Believing that I could do this with diet and exercise, I set about on my journey to lower my blood sugar. Come hell or high water!

No more cakes, cookies, candy, OH, MY! This wasn’t going to be easy, but I was determined. Apples became my salvation — sliced VERY thin (kind of like potato chips, but not). I brought them to work, and devoured them at home. No, it wasn’t the same, but my blood sugar was coming down.

Next on my agenda was exercise. HAHAHAHA! No, really. That’s what they told me to do. This girl was not about to darken the doorway of any self-respecting gym; it just wasn’t going to happen.

I was told that walking, plain old walking, would bring down my blood sugar. I can walk. And walk I did! Evidently, this basic form of exercise has a great effect on belly-fat. Seriously, it was falling off me — probably left in the street somewhere 🙂
You might not have said I was Overweight, but I did need to lose some pounds, and walking did it.

Started WALKING!
Started WALKING!

It wasn’t long before I could see the results. I did notice something else though, my blood sugar was going down and so was I. I began to feel light-headed and sometimes actually passing out. After conferring with my doctor, we decided that I would stop the medication. I did it! I succeeded in lowering my blood sugar through diet and exercise. I thought I was “cured!” Maybe not…