Okay — I’ve been remiss —

The holidays are a crazy, busy, time of the year, and that’s what I’ve been! Crazy and busy. (Thus, I haven’t been blogging or writing) I imagine most of you have been running, buying, wrapping — all the “normal” holiday nonsense. For me, it’s over. I celebrate Christmas, and today I de-decorated my house. (Trust me — it took all of ten minutes!)  🙂  I’m done and moving on.

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Minimum!

Have you figured it out? This is NOT my favorite time of the year, for a multitude of reasons. Not unusual, I know. Many of us are not thrilled with all the chaos and commercialism attached to the holiday season.

Each year I try to make it better, do it “right.” This time around seemed to be more  difficult than those of the recent past; probably, in part, due to my brother’s death in April. We’re usually the two bah-humbugs at Christmas — compadres. We did laugh about it each year and I certainly missed him. We know that emotions have an impact on our eating and, as a result, on our blood sugar levels.

This blog is entitled, Diary of a Dedicated Diabetic, so I’ll move along and focus on T2D. How did you fare during this time of excessive goodies?

I can say that I did pretty well but, I confess it wasn’t perfect. there is NO perfect. I’ve learned over these years to simply do the best I can.

We had Christmas Dinner at my niece and nephew’s home (Thanks, Erika and Keith — it was nothing short of a feast.). It was great. I did have seconds of the sweet potatoes — OMG — they were outstanding! Easy on those carbs, Kathy… As I walked by my niece, carrying my second helping of sweet potatoes, I asked her who prepared them. Her sister-in-law admitted to the feat. Of course, I asked for the recipe — I was told that there were sweet potatoes and sugar. Period. Really bad. The casserole was topped with brown sugar and nuts, but there was a “ton of sugar mixed in with the mashed sweet potatoes.” My niece: “There’s no way you should be eating those.” TOO LATE! O.K., so that was a poor choice but, other than that, the rest of dinner was diabetes-friendly. Most important — I drank a TON of water that day and during the night and was sure to monitor my blood sugar.

Dessert, on the other hand, was insane. My nephew cut up a truckload of fruit. That would have been a good choice. Not the one I made, unfortunately, but good nonetheless. My sister-in-law baked, I’d bet ten different varieties of cookies. My mouth is watering, just thinking about it. All in all, I “probably” had a couple of chocolate chip cookies, I KNOW I had two pieces of fudge, and a couple of peanut butter balls. Thank God there was no cake in sight. Obviously, I slid right down the roller coaster — head first! But, you know what, in the scheme of things, I don’t think it was that bad. I left empty-handed. No dessert in my pockets or a plastic lined pocketbook, and so the night ended. December 26th = back on track.

One day at a time, folks. Every day is DAY#1!

Wishing you countless holiday blessings and PEACE in the new year! 🙂

 

 

 

“If it’s not one thing, it’s another.” — Gilda Radner

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Gilda was right. It’s life (in the big city); you fix one issue and another goes down the tubes. I master my portion control, and “Why aren’t you walking?”

Sometimes, it’s just an uphill battle   IMG_4415but,  fret not.  I can do one day at a time and get all my T2D ducks in a row.

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One Day at a Time!

So, it’s all about acceptance, isn’t it? I accepted the reality that I have diabetes, years ago but, the day-to-day issues are one royal pain in the butt! That’s where Jeff Griffith’s song comes into play.      🙂      Enjoy!

Bottom line = IT’S ALL GOOD, when it’s one-day-at-a-time!

 

 

WHAT DOES DIABETES LOOK LIKE?

I’ve never thought about it — have you?

My journey throughout the Wonderful World of Diabetes has brought me to various conclusions, but also has evoked  countless emotions and questions.  So, asking myself, What Does Diabetes Look Like? kind of stopped me in my tracks.  It was interesting.  I sat, brush in hand, not knowing where to begin. I’ve never taken a class where there was NO judgment. Like many, I was afraid of making a mistake.  In her class, as well as in the book, Barbara stresses that there are no mistakes.

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I had to dig deep to complete this assignment.  As I told you in my last post, I’m taking an art class that expects — no, REQUIRES — the students to take a look “inside.”  The course, Painting Your Way Out of a Corner — The Art of Getting Unstuck,” is also the title of Barbara Diane Barry’s book.  She’s an artist, teacher and author and from what I can see, she’s outstanding in each of those categories.

I took a Watercolor Journaling course last year that helped me explore diabetes, in terms of alternatives to eating, particularly to making bad choices in snacks.  That journal allowed me to write and paint and explore the various things that I was doing to avoid eating the “wrong” foods, as well as activities that I COULD do to achieve that end.  Any hobby/craft that I could work on that would keep my hands and mind occupied, helped me. It helped when I crocheted and when I learned how to quilt and got into beading.  All of those crafts helped. (Maybe the answer IS in the arts and crafts.) Then, when I added the Watercolor Journaling, another level was included in my repertoire.  🙂

But, THIS IS DIFFERENT.  There are no words, “only” artistic expression of feelings. This is an incredibly relaxing and stress-free demonstration of emotion.  Makes you think, right?  🙂

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I’ve been working on What Diabetes LOOKS Like, at least from my perspective.  Here it is:  Remember — no judgment.   🙂

My challenge to you folks, is to give it a shot — not insulin, ART!  Trying something new, can’t hurt!  It might help you to explore your health and build it to a higher, more positive level.  Seems to be helping me.

HAVE FUN!

P.S.  A HUGE thank you to Barbara D. Barry