Tomorrow = a few days…

So, I’m not perfect. (You knew that.) In my last post I said, proclaimed, announced, that my attitude will be better “tomorrow.” Well my tomorrow took three days. Ugh! That’s the bad news. The good news is that my attitude is much better today!

I think I wasn’t eating enough. I ate and the food choices were appropriate, but my timing was WAY off. For instance, I may have skipped breakfast — I believe that it really IS the most important meal of the day. Eating that meal at ten o’clock is absurd, especially if you’ve been up since seven or eight a.m. That’s what’s been  happening. For some reason, I haven’t been hungry when I wake up, so I did some chores and then –POOF– it’s ten or eleven o’clock. Because it was almost lunch time, I decided to skip breakfast and just eat lunch instead. Then, later on when lunch time came around the corner, I wasn’t hungry…SO…I waited until around three or four and had a snack. Needless to say, dinner time came barrelling in and I couldn’t have cared less. Bottom line — I was eating dinner at eight or nine o’clock, if at all. THAT is not the route that a “Dedicated Diabetic” should be following. Okay, so that’s over!

I’m allergic to eggs, so breakfast has never been a nutritious meal for me, and since I was diagnosed, it’s been even more difficult. I actually spent years (pre-diagnosis) having a Boston Creme donut (or two!) to start my day.  It was an easy choice, terribly unhealthy,  but easy. 🙂

Breakfast is so important — it means BREAK the FAST! We need a nutritious meal in the morning to give our bodies the energy needed to start off the day. I’ve been so frustrated that the other day I bought a glucose daily diary/notebook. (Thank you Amazon.) Was that necessary? Not really, I’ve monitored my blood sugar with an online program, charts that I created, with tiny notebooks that fit into my purse, but didn’t have enough room to put the information I wanted to monitor. Oh, yes, I’ve been down this road before. Somewhere deep in the crevices of my brain, there’s a small voice that is SCREAMING, Why waste your time, you’ve done this before?  I scream back SHUT UP! and do what I think is necessary and correct. This journal/chart is about 6 x 9″ and will suit my needs. It  just seemed to be more coordinated, compact, and the information will be at hand when I need to make an entry.  Today will be my Day #One with this new “tool.” I’m laughing at myself, because I’m reminded of all the books on decluttering I’ve purchased — Do you know how much time I wasted reading those books instead of purging/decluttering?  🙂  🙂

Diabetes can often seem to be frustrating, even depressing. I think the only way to do battle with it, is to be prepared. An organized journal, healthy shopping list and a positive attitude might just do the trick. “Might” is not the appropriate term; it leaves space for failure. I’ll choose to say that these tools WILL do the trick.

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The time to start (AGAIN) is NOW!!!!

 

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“Tick-tock, tick-tock — Excuses, excuses, around the clock”

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Are you a procrastinator? An excuse-maker? A clock-watcher?  Join the group! I try, I really do try to make the most of the time I have each day. NOTHING frustrates me more than to look at my list (Yes, I’m a list maker too!) at the end of the day and see that I haven’t accomplished what I set out to do! It makes me crazy.

My brother used to say that we have the “procrastination gene.” We were a family of last-minute doers! When I was in school, I thought it was the rush to get a paper done that gave me a “rush.” Now, though, I’m not interested in that; I want completion. Period.

I listened to a wonderful TED Talk on the subject of making the most out of the time we have. Funny, but true; it smacked me right in the face with the fact that I waste time. I detest the thought of that — I feel strongly that we’re put on this earth for a purpose and wasting time is the worst thing I can do. The TED Talk helped to set me back on track — including in terms of my ” life with diabetes.” SO many things are important to fit into my day, to care for my T2D. They bear repeating:

  • PREPARE MEALS  a h e a d  of time. Cooking two meals and freezing one may seem like it takes a lot of extra time but, that’s simply not true. It’s such a pleasure when, a week later you can defrost the (second) meal, heat it up without the rigamarole of the chopping, cooking, etc., that you did the first time around. Give this gift to yourself — you WON’T regret it. I promise. If you’re working full time and can devote a couple of hours on a weekend, you can probably get four or six meals done and frozen for the weeks to come. Sheer joy. 🙂
  • MONITOR my blood sugar. Two to three times a day “depending,” is what my doctor suggests. It’s so annoying, I tell myself. Put your big girl pants on and just DO IT! is my next thought. I’ve devised a chart and just fill in the numbers. There are also websites that accommodate this issue, but I believe in keeping mine simple. I include the date, times of testing, and the resulting blood glucose number. I have, at times, included the food that was consumed. Discuss it with your doctor. My purpose in bringing up the subject of monitoring is that, for ME, it keeps me aware and pushes away that damn denial. The NUMBERS DON’T LIE! 
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    Monitor glucose regularly
  • EXERCISE. The time I spend walking keeps me a lot healthier than time vegging out in front of the t.v. When I schedule “hoofing it” into my calendar, I KNOW that I’m doing the right thing for me.

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    Start WALKING!
  • TICK-TOCK folks — let’s make the BEST use of the time we have!

IMPORTANT: If you didn’t listen to the TED Talk, noted above, I strongly urge you to do it now. Take the “TIME!”   🙂

DIABETES — I laugh in your face…

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Who knew?  Not me!  Evidently Tom Hanks was diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes and announced it on the David Letterman Show in 2013.  Guess I missed that episode.

As you know, I believe in using humor to help me through my day with diabetes. However, when watching the link (see below) about his diagnosis, I wanted to say, “Be careful, Mr. Hanks, guess who might just have the last laugh?”  

Tom Hanks is an actor whom I admire and was hoping that he was taking his diagnosis seriously, when I came upon an article in a magazine known as Diabetes Focus.

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The article mentioned his announcement on the Letterman Show,  but it also went on to explain the steps he and his wife (Rita Wilson) were taking to manage his T2D and improving their lifestyle as a whole. Those steps included limiting sugar and exercising on a daily basis. He took it seriously.

Hanks pointed out that genetics plays an important role and that he was “genetically inclined” to get the disease.  I wish I’d understood that, those many years ago when I was diagnosed.  I’d had two babies that weighed in at 9.3 lbs. and 9 pounds even, and I was informed that gestational diabetes simply meant that I “might get diabetes later in life.” It was treated as “nothing to worry about.”  Believe me, that “later in life” showed up much sooner than I’d anticipated!

The GOOD NEWS in this is that, SO much more is known about diabetes today and, it’s no longer treated as “nothing to worry about.” It’s an epidemic, and I’m hoping that parents world wide are paying attention to their medical history, the food that they and their children are eating and the exercise that takes place with their family members each day.

Should we LAUGH IN THE FACE OF DIABETES?  Hell yeah! BUT, only with the knowledge that we are controlling it with diet, exercise, and medication (if needed). It’s a serious matter, that can be dealt with a dose of humor — to get through the day.  🙂

Sometimes, Laughter is the Best Medicine!    🙂

 

 

 

 

“Dining Out v.s. Eating Out — How to Deal With It”

Thursday, May 14, 2015

“Dining Out  v.s.  Eating Out — How to Deal With It”

Is there a difference? Absolutely — at least to me there is.

“Eating Out” in my book means grabbing something to eat and moving along with the day. Often, no real thought goes into this. If I eat in a rush or because I’m hungry or it’s time, and I’ve got things to do and places to go, I’m usually in for a mistake.

Example: The #1 Meal at Nathan’s, a hot dog, fries, and a soda. There’s nothing healthy on that tray. (OMG, I love those dogs! Sorry, but it’s true.)

I’ve found that other fast-food places usually pose the same difficult choices for me. (Disclaimer: Some DO have a healthy choice or two and some even indicate the calories for each item — that’s a help). Do I make good choices when I’m there? No. My bad, I admit it. The smell of the fries overtakes my senses, my mouth begins to water, my breathing accelerates and a bad decision is usually ahead. Allowing that ‘rush’ to overcome my brain is frustrating! Do I cave? Sometimes. No one ever said diabetes was easy, but they did say it can be controlled.

My answer to this dilemma? DON’T go in. For me, I’m aware that eating in a fast-food restaurant will lead to disaster. I need to think about what I’m doing to my body. Slow down. Make a healthy decision. What would Spock do? “Live long and prosper,” of course. Now THAT sounds like a wise decision.

O.K., here’s the other end of the spectrum — “Dining Out.”
If I’m going to lunch or dinner with friends, or breakfast too, for that matter, my first line of defense is the Internet. I enter the name of the restaurant, pull up the menu, check out the choices and determine what the best decision for me might be. It’s easy to make the right choice ahead of time, sticking to it is the difficult part.

I’ve found that there are tools to help me follow through with my healthy choice:

1. Drink an 8 oz. glass of water, prior to leaving for the restaurant.

2. Consume a healthy snack an hour before going.

3. Remember that, even though there’s a menu, you can usually get any of the items on it grilled. Just ask.

4. Avoid the prix fixed choices. They may be a good deal money wise, but they usually include an appetizer and dessert. Do you really need that? NO, and try not to convince yourself that you ‘deserve’ it — you deserve to be healthy.

5. IMPORTANT:  If at all possible, be the FIRST to order, and then hand your menu to the waiter. It’s not spiritual reading; no need to hold onto it. Consider your decision complete. Done! Finito!

6. Stick to your guns; don’t let anyone sabotage your decision. Here’s an answer to:

“You’re not having an appetizer?”
Ans: “No. Saving room for dinner. I’ve been looking forward to it all day. I don’t want to spoil my appetite.”

What, no dessert?”
Ans: “Are you kidding? I couldn’t eat another thing. Dinner was deeeelicious!”

Believe it or not, you will survive without an appetizer and dessert, and your friends will get used to you making healthy choices. With any luck, they’ll follow your lead!

The payoff at the end of the meal is that you will have made good decisions that will lead to a healthy life. Isn’t that all that matters?

Hey! Let me know the tools that you use to make healthy choices
–OR– Having difficulties? Want to share..?


 

 

“How It Began” or “You MUST Be Joking”

Saturday, September 20, 2014

“How It Began” or “You MUST Be Joking”

It was about 12 years ago that I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes. My doctor’s words were clear, “Your blood work is back, and you have diabetes.” My response, “That’s ridiculous! How could that be? I feel fine.”

She asked me some questions and I told her that when my son was born, my obstetrician did some testing. He said that because my bouncing baby boy weighed in at 9 lbs., 3 oz., he just wanted to check. The results were: Gestational Diabetes. “What does that mean?” I asked. “It just means that later in life you could become diabetic.” Knowing that we were discussing the far and distant future, I put it out of my mind. (That was in 1975.) I was a kid, who knew?

I told my doctor, “He said LATER IN LIFE.” Her response: “This is it.” I was stunned, and still wasn’t convinced. She asked about my family history. Explaining that diabetes was not “hanging” from MY family tree, unless you count my brother… “There you go,” she said. (Ah, genetics!)  And the journey began.

Posted by K Keevins at 11:29 PM 2 comments: