BELATED HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Happy that 2016 has arrived?  I sure am.

My last post was December 4th.  I’ve been slightly distracted — a brief hospital stay (thanks to my wacko heart), and side effects of a new medication, kept me from posting.  BUT, I’m back in action and really happy and grateful to be writing again!   IMG_3344

So, dare I bring up Resolutions for the New Year?  If you made any, have you kept them?

Many moons ago I stopped making resolutions.  Why, you ask?  Simple. I rarely kept them and then suffered remorse, which resulted in doing MORE of what I had resolved to do LESS. 🙂   I decided that a more positive path would put more balance into my life. Focusing on BALANCE — that’s the answer!  Every area of our lives, food, exercise, family, work, all require balance.

The question is, How do we manage this juggling act, we call life?  I have some ideas on this topic. I’ve tried many methods to get this miss-mosh of a life in order. Some have been somewhat successful, others might be referred to as a dismal failure. What’s imperative is that we KEEP ON TRYING!  Here’s a suggestion, based on something that I always need to do:  MAKE A LIST…

There’s no way to have balance in our life, if we don’t know what it is that we value. So…

1.  MAKE A LIST— not in any specific order.  Do you value Work, Fun (recreation), Health, Friends, Spirituality, Family?  Any others?  Write them down.

2.   O.K., now take another sheet of paper and place it next to the list you’ve just completed.  Write PRIORITIES, at the top of this page.  Don’t rush.  Think carefully.

3.  Now, take your first list and write those things that you value, on your PRIORITIES LISTin order, of course, of priority! How important is each one to you, and where should it fit in on the list?  Don’t worry, you can’t make a mistake — this is YOUR list.  [Actually, I found this the most difficult part — What?  You don’t want FUN to be your #1 priority???]   🙂

4.   Next, take your list of priorities, and and create a chart that will allow you to manage your time in relation to your priorities.  Write the amount of TIME (hours, minutes) that you are willing and able to devote to each. Hmmm, is this exercise starting to make you feel uncomfortable?  Don’t panic, you’ll figure it out, and nothing is written in stone. Time is fluid, and sometimes we’re forced to make adjustments.

At this point, you’ve carefully examined your list of priorities — you’ve committed, in writing, those things, tasks, and people that you value the most AND, you’ve established the amount of time that you’re able to devote to each.  GOOD FOR YOU!        

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I CAN DO IT!

For ME managing my diabetes HAS to come FIRST on my list, and I imagine on yours, as well.  Most of us Type 2 diabetics have learned that, if we don’t put management of our diabetes first, nothing else falls into place.

Reflecting at the end of the day (I journal) has helped me to see what area(s) need to be improved.

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My journal helps to keep me on track!

Making time to do those things that make us happy, bring enjoyment to our life, is IMPERATIVE.

We only go this way once, folks!  At least, I think so…

HAPPY NEW YEAR, dear readers, and may 2016 bring laughter, love, and good health into each of your lives — Oh, and BALANCE too!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BURNOUT!

Diabetes Burnout?  I’ve never heard the term “burnout” used in connection to diabetes.  It makes sense though!

         Keep Walking!   Long Beach, NY

I read an article today by Catherine Price, a journalist who has diabetes and saw myself all over the page.  Maybe that’s my problem.  I hear myself complaining (in my own head, and sometimes to others) that I’m so sick of it, Why me? I just want a piece of cake, or pizza, or bread.  I don’t want to exercise. Waaa, waaa!  I actually bore myself with this whining and complaining.

Price has a good point.  She suggests treating diabetes burnout by removing “junk” (things we need to do) from other areas of our life.  By doing this, we’d make more “mental space” available to take care of the diabetes without feeling overwhelmed. I thought about it.

One of the worst self-inflicted stressors in my life is procrastination.  I can put off doing just about anything, paying my bills in a timely fashion, emptying the garbage, food shopping, gardening, all of which, shortens deadlines, adds more stressors AND fills up my head with “shoulds.” In other words, procrastination leads to negativity.  If I stopped procrastinating about even just ONE area of my life, and completed that task on time, I’d have less stress and more room to be able to do the “right thing in managing my diabetes” — thus, I wouldn’t feel so overwhelmed (which leads to neglect of my diabetes). Good idea!

Because diabetes requires constant management, it’s never-ending.  Of course there are times when we feel overwhelmed — I sure feel it — it’s exhausting, and sometimes I just don’t want to “play” anymore!  Feeling bad about it is okay every once in awhile.  I just know that I can’t wallow around in that pond anymore, no good will come from that.

Price says to “nurture yourself.”  She’s right, we all deserve it.  Take the time to do something that will make YOU feel good.  Schedule it into your calendar.  My choice is a massage, sheer heaven. But if you’re not comfortable with that, plan something shorter.  Take a walk, drive to the beach, breathe in that sea air.  30-minutes of self-care will reset your attitude.  You’ll feel better, more in control. By arranging/scheduling breathing space into your non-diabetic life, you’ll realize that not every second has to be focused on diabetes. 15 – 30 minutes spent meditating or practicing yoga is time well spent. Ahhh. Relief.  Sounds good, doesn’t it?  Maybe you’re ahead of the game and you’re already doing it.   If not, what have you got to lose.

I started chair yoga about 6 weeks ago.  Because of an arm injury, I’m unable to practice “regular” yoga, so I took this route.  It’s been wonderful — every Wednesday for one hour!

Catherine Price seems to have a good handle on diabetes burnout.  Click on diabetes burnout for the complete article.