Menus — On-the-Run, as well as At Home!

November 6, 2016

In a recent post, I let you know that I’d gone to a dietician at the Diabetes Education Center near my home. I said I’d post information that Maggie (Registered Dietetician and Certified Diabetes Educator) had given me, in terms of monitoring my food, choices, and alternatives. Balancing our blood glucose levels is imperative, and eating the right foods at the correct times will help T2D’s to do just that!

BREAKFAST is touted as being The Most Important Meal of the DayNOT in my world!  I want it to be.  I recognize the importance, but I have some issues with it. I’ve got ISSUES!!!  🙂  🙂  🙂

  • I’m allergic to eggs. That leaves out a LOT of recipes.
  • I have a “thing” about the TEXTURE of some foods. Therefore, Oatmeal = I’d rather be shot!

That being said, Maggie helped me with some alternatives.  So that YOU get the full benefit of my appointment with her, I’m going to list ALL the choices (including the ones I won’t be eating).

First off, she gave me a brief list of some “At Home Menus” that contain 45-60 g of carb; less than 10 g fat; at least 8 g fiber. Perfect, right? O.K., take a look:

  • Oatmeal, 1 cup cooked  (Hope YOU enjoy it!)
  • 1/2 cup 1% milk
  • 1/2 apple

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  • 2 Kashi Go Lean Waffles
  • 1 T. Light Margarine/Sugar-Free Syrup
  • 1/2 cup blueberries
  • 8 oz. 1% milk

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  • 2 egg whites OR 1/2 cup, Egg Beaters    (NO CAN DO, per allergist; but, that’s just me. YOU can feel free to dig in!)
  • Low fat Sausage Links
  • 2 slices whole wheat toast
  • 1 T. Lite Margarine
  • 1 small orange

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Here are some “On the Run Menus” for those of us who are on-the-run!  They contain 30-45 g carb!  All good so far!

  • Cannon Lite n’ Fit Yogurt
  • BelVita Breakfast Biscuit — mixed berry  (7 g. fat)

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Deli:

  • 2 egg whites on Rye
  • 1 cup fresh fruit (10 g. fat, 15 g carb.)
  • Quaker Breakfast Flats (27 g. carbs)

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  • Special K Flatbread Breakfast Sandwich (egg, vegetable, Pepper Jack cheese)
  • small fruit  (7 g. fat)

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  • McD’s Egg McMuffin*
  • Apple Slices                     IMG_3716

(12 g. fat)

* In my case, I can eliminate the egg and have the McMuffin with sausage and cheese!

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I have a mini-confession:  I NEVER eat margarine! Nope, I eat the real deal. Butter makes everything better.  🙂   The truth is, I eat VERY little of it — no big deal.

So, my fellow T2D’s that’s it for some of Maggie’s breakfast suggestions. Whether we’re eating AT HOME or ON-the-RUN, now we have NO excuse!  (Thanks, Maggie.)

I believe I promised a list of Maggie’s great snack ideas, too. That will be for another post. However, in an effort to encourage you to meet with a Dietician/Diabetes Educator in your area, I won’t be giving you the entire list. After all, I’m NOT Wiki-leaks!!!!!

 

REMEMBER:  Consult your physician before making ANY changes to you Diabetes Treatment Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

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What’s on Your Plate?

Sunday, August 7, 2016

“PLATE” #1

Do you live for a buffet/smorgasbord dinner? NOOOOoooooo! My conscience screams, DON’T do it! If you have issues with portion control, that kind of dining can be a downfall.

I read a great article in Everyday Healththe title was, “Sizing Up Your Plate: Why Portion Control Matters.”

Everyday Health does a great job in its discussion of diabetes and this T2D “listens” very carefully when they “talk.”  D. Wolter-Nitta, RD, CDE, nutritionist and certified diabetes educator at Montefiore Medical Center in Bronx, NY, was quoted on the topic of portion control. For the Type 2 Diabetic, who may be overweight, losing some pounds can lead to better blood sugar control and “possibly” less need for medication. Some of the information noted in the article will be familiar to you and some will seem like common sense. I read everything diabetes related. Truth is, there’s always more to learn and, if nothing else, reading the info will put it in the forefront of my mind. Can’t hurt, right? Everyday Health noted that Jill Weisenberger, RD, CDE, and writer, out of Yorktown, VA, stressed that “not eating proper carbs at a meal can lead to higher or lower blood sugars,” and we know what that can produce. Problems.

She, along with others, had some good points:

  • Weigh and Measure your food. LOL — right!  We’ll see about that.  🙂    Okay, I’ve never been thrilled with doing “the scale thing,” but she’s right. It’s really difficult to guess how much food is the right amount, and we know that portion control is imperative. That’s why…
  • Visual Aids are so important! I was having difficulty awhile back in my T2D journey, and I went to a diabetes educator for help. I thought I had portion control down pat but was stunned to learn that the fact that I was eating apples the size of a softball didn’t make the grade. She tossed me a tennis ball and informed me that THIS was the size I should have been consuming. “Really?” I queried, while looking at the small ball that seemed to be lost in my hand. I realized that the difference in size meant that I was eating what would be considered two apples at each sitting. AAArrrggghhh! That explained my weight gain.                 IMG_3716By the way, when shopping for apples, TRUST ME, the ones that come packaged in the plastic bags are the size you should be eating.   It’s called SMALL! At first, I was saddened by the fact that my beloved apple snack had just shrunken to about one-third of its size.  Here’s what helped a LOT:  I sliced the apple into very thin slices — VERY thin!  During that same appointment, the Diabetes Educator shocked me into realizing that I’d been overeating just about everything — without even knowing it. She showed me a plastic hamburger to demonstrate the portion that we should be eating.  It seemed so small and alone on the plate — probably one-third of the size I’d been scoffing down. Next on her agenda was the “deck of cards” — another visual aid to slap me silly into “getting” the world of portion control.  WHAT??? How many of us eat a portion of chicken, fish or beef that takes up one-third to half of the dinner plate? Well, get a grip! The deck of cards it is.
  • Read Food Labels!   Besides the obvious — carbs, protein, fiber, it’s important to check out the food labels for the SERVING SIZE.  You may be surprised to learn that a can or package contains more than one serving per person.
  • Use Smaller Plates.  This is an easy one. Substitute a luncheon-sized plate for a regular dinner plate. This tricks your eye, because it looks like you have a lot of food on your plate when, in fact, your plate is smaller.    🙂
  • Beverages. Again, read those labels. You may be surprised to see that the serving size information will force you to make a different decision. Drinking is the fastest way to get carbs into your system; therefore, for better blood glucose management, it’s better to eat your carbs than drink them.
  • SNACK, SNACK, SNACK! Tim Harlan, M.D. and Medical Director of Tulane University Group in New Orleans, states (in Everyday Health) that snacking is important for the diabetic. He says that snacking “controls overeating, controls cravings, and keeps blood sugar stable.” MAKES SENSE!  🙂
  • WRITE, WRITE, WRITE! Another common sense tip. Keeping a food log is important when managing blood glucose levels. Simply put, it keeps us on track and holds us accountable. Not a big deal.

    “PLATE” #2 — continued in next post — will focus on eating out and will include social events such as weddings!

So folks, WHAT’S ON YOUR PLATE???

 

 

DIABETES — It’s Complicated…

Thursday, March 24, 2016

…but, I’m using my BRAIN!  You know, to sort things out, organize my diabetic needs, in the interest of good health.  In my prior post, I spoke about responsibility.  Sleep habits, healthy foods, and exercise, fall into that category and MUST be a priority in my life and, I  accept complete responsibility for each sector.  This really IS the way to good diabetes management and great glucose levels.

I walked this morning — first thing.  Ugh. I hated every minute, but I did it; NO CHOICE.

IMG_3503
Started WALKING — again!

Food planning, I’ve FINALLY accepted it is imperative to avoid “slips.” I went shopping today with lunch and dinner menus a priority.  My freezer is chock full of chicken and fish, so my basket was filled mostly with vegetables and fruits.

Breakfast is the most difficult meal of the day for me. Why? Chocolate chip pancakes, waffles, of course!  Either would be my choice. This is the ONE MEAL that is a problem for me, and it’s not a new dilemma. I’m allergic to eggs, so there’s that. I like most foods, but my issue is the consistency of some of them — cottage cheese, for example, oatmeal, yogurt, anything mushy or gushy — I just can’t get them down.  What to do? Any suggestions? The “most important meal of the day” (or so THEY say) is the one that I can’t seem to resolve. HELP! PLEASE, I’m pleading with you! 

 

Regarding organization, new recipes are vital for me to keep interested in food preparation;  I’ve been scouting the Internet for different ones.  I’ll share of my T2D epicurean delights, as I make them  🙂  Variety is the spice of life!

I’m determined and dedicated to use my BRAIN to carve out my path to successful diabetes management!

IMG_4371

About my BREAKFAST DILEMMA, seriously, if you have any ideas, I’d be thrilled to hear them.  THANKS!!!

Blood Sugar = 86        Weight = 148

 

 

Reassessing Acceptance

Second Post for Jan. 28th, 2016

So, I’ve been contemplating whether or not I REALLY accept the “fact” that I have diabetes, OR am I in denial?  Hmmm.  I thought I had this down pat.

I remember well, when I accepted that I had this disease and that I could manage it, and that it wouldn’t be a big deal. Doing EVERYTHING right, I called myself the “poster person for diabetes.” But that didn’t happen until I went through many stages, some of which I’ll mention.  These are all very normal and typical, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy.

The anger, (This is crap! Why me?). I actually ate AT the diabetes. (While stuffing cake and cookies down my throat, I remember thinking,  I’ll show you!)  Needless to say, that didn’t work out well.

The bargaining (O.K., so maybe I have it.  I’ll just cut down on the carbs, and I’ll be off the hook.  I’ll be fine.  C’mon God, work with me.).

The denial stage is wicked (NOT ME; NO WAY! NO, NO, No!  The lab made a mistake.) …and the beat went on and on and on, until FINALLY — ACCEPTANCE!

WHY then, after all this time, am I floundering, doubting? Why is acceptance even an issue or something that I would be discussing, at this point?

Simple. What I didn’t realize was that because you HAVE acceptance, does NOT mean you’ll keep it!  Acceptance, it seems, is fragile. If I’m not as vigilant as I should be, acceptance can slip away.

Over the years, I’ve learned the importance of education in relation to diabetes. I spent a great deal of time today reading about diabetes.  I have LOTS of what I refer to as “spiritual reading,” on the topic.  🙂    Books — TONS of them.  Article, after article (including the ones noted, via the links on this page).  It helped. It clarified what I already knew, and brought it right to the front of my mind where it belongs. The information is important, it’s a tool, sometimes a weapon, to defend my health. If you are struggling, I highly recommend going back to the resources that you have. Read, read, read.

I know, we all know, that we have to keep our diabetes management right at the forefront of our minds.  I HAS to be the most important thought that enters my head.

Are you familiar with Steve Harvey?  I’ve read his books, and I love his positive attitude. Today, I heard him say, “Inch by inch, everything’s a cinch!”  Isn’t that the truth?  One step at a time, one meal at a time, one day at a time.

** Now that I’ve “reassessed” whether or not I really have diabetes, I’m laughing at myself.  How absurd! Of course I do. But, trust me, that denial just creeps in when you least expect it.  BE AWARE!

Moving on — tomorrow will be another Day #1!

PLANNING = GOOD DECISIONS

Another day #1 began with breakfast.  Today had to be different, smart.  So I set out to formulate a plan.

I’m really NOT good at getting up early.  Definitely improving, but not perfect.  The plan begins:

Get up bet 7-7:30    Take blood sugar, eat breakfast, walk for one hour, back home and shower.  Take blood sugar again.  O.K., now that’s a good start.  Planning the rest of the day and making SURE to have lunch, while including regular glucose monitoring, will lead to a successful day for this diabetic.

Isn’t it frustrating, when you know EXACTLY what to do, and you DON’T do it?

Planning = TIMING  meal schedule properly.
Planning = TIMING meal schedule properly.

Nobody ever said this was going to be easy, but I know that when I plan my meals and schedule out my day appropriately, the day ends in success — good numbers and a smile on my face.

Timing is everything —

I CAN DO THIS — one day at a time.   🙂

Suggestions welcome.