Lessons Learned… (A.)

Saturday, April 30, 2016

My last post, I believe, was written on April 3.  It was a period of time during which I was feeling beyond stressed out. From that point until today, I haven’t been able to write a word. Nothing.

My brother was very ill and passed away on April 6th. (R.I.P., Joseph D. Masterson). My life came to a screeching halt. Those of you who have experienced profound loss, know that there’s a fog that seems to descend upon you and engulf your very being. You walk, talk, function, but it’s amid a bubble that seems to envelop you — at least that’s the way it’s been for me.

My “writer friends” told me to write it out; I couldn’t. They said it would be cathartic. I didn’t want that — I wanted him back.  Now.  For just one more conversation, one more laugh. Of course, that’s not going to happen.

In the part of his eulogy that I wrote, I thanked him for the impact he had on my life. It was huge.  He taught me not only to understand Shakespeare, but to LOVE him. I mentioned Hemingway, Steinbeck and a host of other authors to whom he “introduced” me. He taught me to fight AGAINST discrimination and FOR feminism. Respecting the opinions of others is a great lesson to learn from an older sibling.  There was that — and SO much more.

My brother was a Type 2 Diabetic  (insulin dependent) who chose not to control his diet. I only hope that I learn from his mistakes. I promised myself that I will follow a healthy diet and exercise, in a effort to control my diabetes — as a tribute to him.

This segment of Lessons Learned (A.) is about the impact of the loss of a loved one on the monitoring of my diabetes.  Maybe I should say the LACK of monitoring. No appetite. NONE. I forced myself to eat to the best of my ability during these weeks. I learned that sadness robbed me of my appetite, my everything. I kept telling myself that I HAD to eat because of this damned disease — and I did. Not much, but I did.

24 days have passed since my brother left this earth, and as I write this post, I realize that I’m doing exactly what he would NOT want me to do. So, as of tomorrow, May 1st, I will do what I need to do to stay healthy.  I’ll do it, with tears in my eyes; but, I’ll do it.

#luckylittlesister

Lessons Learned (B.)  will be posted tomorrow…

DIABETES — I laugh in your face…

Sunday, April 3, 2016

Who knew?  Not me!  Evidently Tom Hanks was diagnosed with Type Two Diabetes and announced it on the David Letterman Show in 2013.  Guess I missed that episode.

As you know, I believe in using humor to help me through my day with diabetes. However, when watching the link (see below) about his diagnosis, I wanted to say, “Be careful, Mr. Hanks, guess who might just have the last laugh?”  

Tom Hanks is an actor whom I admire and was hoping that he was taking his diagnosis seriously, when I came upon an article in a magazine known as Diabetes Focus.

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The article mentioned his announcement on the Letterman Show,  but it also went on to explain the steps he and his wife (Rita Wilson) were taking to manage his T2D and improving their lifestyle as a whole. Those steps included limiting sugar and exercising on a daily basis. He took it seriously.

Hanks pointed out that genetics plays an important role and that he was “genetically inclined” to get the disease.  I wish I’d understood that, those many years ago when I was diagnosed.  I’d had two babies that weighed in at 9.3 lbs. and 9 pounds even, and I was informed that gestational diabetes simply meant that I “might get diabetes later in life.” It was treated as “nothing to worry about.”  Believe me, that “later in life” showed up much sooner than I’d anticipated!

The GOOD NEWS in this is that, SO much more is known about diabetes today and, it’s no longer treated as “nothing to worry about.” It’s an epidemic, and I’m hoping that parents world wide are paying attention to their medical history, the food that they and their children are eating and the exercise that takes place with their family members each day.

Should we LAUGH IN THE FACE OF DIABETES?  Hell yeah! BUT, only with the knowledge that we are controlling it with diet, exercise, and medication (if needed). It’s a serious matter, that can be dealt with a dose of humor — to get through the day.  🙂

Sometimes, Laughter is the Best Medicine!    🙂